My Personal Finance Journey

Personal finance observation, musing and decisions in a journey toward financial independence by 2020 with at least $3 million.


By Topics

Overall:
0. About (10)
1. My Progress (139)
2. Car & Home (107)
3. Credit (138)
4. Banking (33)
5. Saving (49)
6. Investing (308)
7. Taxes (89)
8. Spending (74)
9. Misc (97)
A. Archive (49)



MONTHLY ARCHIVE

Feb 2014 (3)
Jan 2014 (6)
Jan 2012 (1)
Apr 2011 (1)
Mar 2011 (1)
Feb 2011 (1)
Jan 2011 (1)
Dec 2010 (1)
Oct 2010 (1)
Sep 2010 (1)
Aug 2010 (1)
Jul 2010 (1)
Jun 2010 (1)
May 2010 (1)
Apr 2010 (1)
Mar 2010 (6)
Feb 2010 (2)
Jan 2010 (7)
Dec 2009 (3)
Feb 2009 (4)
Jan 2009 (8)
Dec 2008 (1)
Jun 2008 (2)
May 2008 (2)
Apr 2008 (5)
Feb 2008 (3)
Jan 2008 (15)
Dec 2007 (32)
Nov 2007 (6)
Oct 2007 (8)
Sep 2007 (9)
Aug 2007 (24)
Jul 2007 (2)
Jun 2007 (1)
May 2007 (3)
Apr 2007 (4)
Mar 2007 (4)
Feb 2007 (13)
Jan 2007 (6)
Dec 2006 (3)
Nov 2006 (7)
Oct 2006 (7)
Sep 2006 (6)
Aug 2006 (4)
Jul 2006 (10)
Jun 2006 (1)
May 2006 (3)
Apr 2006 (2)
Mar 2006 (6)
Feb 2006 (6)
Jan 2006 (3)
Dec 2005 (1)
Nov 2005 (9)
Oct 2005 (8)
Sep 2005 (13)
Aug 2005 (25)
Jul 2005 (16)
Jun 2005 (17)
May 2005 (19)
Apr 2005 (20)
Mar 2005 (24)
Feb 2005 (23)
Jan 2005 (36)
Dec 2004 (40)
Nov 2004 (34)
Oct 2004 (17)
Sep 2004 (21)
Aug 2004 (59)
Jul 2004 (37)
Jun 2004 (31)
May 2004 (29)
Apr 2004 (52)
Mar 2004 (49)
Feb 2004 (49)
Jan 2004 (31)
Dec 2003 (48)
Nov 2003 (52)
Oct 2003 (29)
Sep 2003 (8)
Aug 2003 (5)
Jul 2003 (2)
Jun 2003 (2)
May 2003 (5)
Apr 2003 (2)
Mar 2003 (2)
Feb 2003 (3)
Jan 2003 (29)



 

How A Year Is Lost

Contributed by mm | January 31, 2009 10:42 PM PST

portfolioicon.jpgAs a farewell bid to 2008, I compiled a full reconciliation table of the investment gains and losses in the unfortunate year of 2008.

Technical Notes:

- Purchase = Total money paid to acquire additional stock or mutual fund shares, including commission.
- Sale = Net proceeds from selling stock or mutual fund shares, after commission.
- Cash Dividends = Total dividends received from stock.
- Note on mutual fund dividends: since all mutual fund dividends are automatically reinvested, there is no cash flow transaction to record. Additional shares from reinvestment are reflected in the year-end Quantity column.

portfolio-2008.jpg

More PFBlog Articles You Might Find Interesting ...


This Post Has Received 11 Comments. Share Your Opinions Too.


Deborah Commented on February 1, 2009

I look at that and I think what a shame.

Two years ago I was telling all my friends to get out of their banks stocks and wrestling with my husband to let me sell his. I have grateful friends.

I have been 100% out of the market for 15 months now and I am not yet ready to enter it again.


MM Commented on February 1, 2009

Good call. Make sure you know when to get back in!


Tbone Commented on February 1, 2009

Your panic in selling most of your stocks just proves that you are not emotionally detached from your investments. Kind of goes against what you preach; you're already talking about getting back in the market with systematic purchases, but then why did you sell low?
I don't see why you sold AMEX, BoA, Ebay, JPM, COP, pfe, and some others if you are still investing for the long term. I anything buy up some of those depressed stocks and then sell the higher cost basis on some of them for a write off. Looks like you're going to be carrying those losses forward for decades!


Ed Commented on February 3, 2009

I am courious why you have not considered taking the opportunity to loading up on low cost index funds.....? Seems to me that one thing many of us have learned is that it is TOUGH to beat the market. With that being said, you may as well minimize the one thing we can control... costs.


CPA1298 Commented on February 3, 2009

MM thanks for providing this detailed assessment.

I'd like to echo what Ed said; the additional cost of active management is at least $10,000/yr on your portfolio. Couldn't you just invest in VTI, VWO, VEU and BND exchange traded funds? Your record-keeping would be so much simpler and your after-tax, after-expenses returns would almost certainly be higher.


CPA1298 Commented on February 3, 2009

MM - in a comment to your 'annual update' you said you lost about 20% during the year. But, the loss you're showing above of $217,551 divided by your beginning actively managed investments of $706,212 (excl cash) is a loss of more than 30%. Even at this loss, you did have a better year than the indices. Have you been tracking your performance vs. benchmarks?


MM Commented on February 3, 2009

CPA1298, thanks for the question. A better way is to include the cash position too (it is a conscious decision at the start of the year to keep a higher-than-benchmark cash position). So it is $218k/$864k (or closer to $900k considering the cash that was generated from savings throughout the year).

No, i haven't calculated my performance vs benchmark.


dan Commented on February 3, 2009

You should not take into consideration your cash balance (earnings you made during the year from your job and side business). That should be excluded and only market securities counted when you compare gain vs loss. So you are in the 30-40% loss range like everyone else. If you are making $200k in cash from the job and side business you just made up for all your loss. In the given year you can say. I only lost 5%, but that is not true when you measure the performance of your securities. Which is what most of the people visiting this site are looking at, not your cash balance as if you were a company but rather your "investment" portofolio.


MM Commented on February 4, 2009

Dan, I respectfully disagree. Unless you are saying cash is not part of the asset allocation picture. Do you think Morningstar should strip off cash impact from those fund managers who consciously keep a lot of cash last year? And if we go down this line, shall we draw the line on money market funds, short term fixed income funds, or something else?

Anyway, yes, I lose 30%+ if I only count my stock and fund investment (and it is a valid yardstick in itself for stock or fund picking skills), but fortunately I didn't lose the 30% of my total net worth :-) The latter is probably what it counts for long-term survivorship.


Josh Commented on February 10, 2009

Deborah, you have me by one month. I exited the market completely in December 2007, although I have put almost 20% back into the market over the past few months.


Вадим Commented on February 11, 2009

Damn crisis! Thanks for information. I think it is going worse next months.



Read More ... 308 Posts In The Same Category










This page was last rebuilt at January 27, 2014 07:32 AM PST.
 

RSS FEED





PERSONAL FINANCE BLOGS I READ

Consumerism Commentary
Get Rich Slowly
My Money Blog
All Financial Matters
The Simple Dollar






.



Copyright 2003-2014, PFBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. (Privacy Policy)